edTPA/ORtpa

Elementary Teacher Candidates will be completing the ORtpa, during a 2nd pilot year. In February/March, they will be plan and teach (and video tape) 2 lessons in literacy, and 1 lesson in mathematics. The rest of their reflection and analysis will be completed at OSU, but this is a learning experience and CTs are allowed to support the planning process.
 
Secondary Teacher Candidates will be completing the edTPA. edTPA is a nationally scored assessment of a Teacher Candidate’s ability to plan, teach, and assess. Teacher candidates have found it to be an opportunity to demonstrate all that they have learned during the MAT program. It is a state and program requirement to pass the nationally scored summative edTPA in the Spring, in order to be recommended for teacher licensure.

During the Fall student teaching placement your TC will be guided through a formative edTPA assessment in OSU Coursework. The Fall formative edTPA is locally scored and is designed to give them feedback to encourage growth and lead to success on the nationally scored summative edTPA. You are asked to meet with your TC for 30-40 minutes to plan when they will teach the three lesson segment for edTPA (between Oct. 17th and Nov. 4th). You will also help your TC establish a topic for the formative edTPA along with gathering resources.

During the Winter student teaching placement your TC will work on his/her summative edTPA writing independently, but can plan their lessons with you, their CT.
 

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edTPA Tasks

Candidates plan 3 consecutive lessons, called a learning segment, based on the subject-area focus, supported by subject-area standards. They then teach the learning segment, video recording their interactions with students as well as interactions among students during instruction. They also assess, informally and formally, students learning throughout the learning segment. For each of these tasks, they submit artifacts (i.e., lesson plans, video clips, assessment materials, instructional materials, student work samples), together with written commentaries (i.e., reflections and analyses).
                            

Task 1: Planning for Instruction & Assessment

How do the candidate’s plans for instruction build students’ abilities to demonstrate the central focus?

How does the candidate use knowledge of his/her students to target support for students to demonstrate the central focus (i.e., provide access to the lesson for the class as a whole and specific individual or groups with similar needs, anticipate where students will struggle)?

How does the candidate use knowledge of his/her students to justify instructional plans (i.e., prior learning; personal, cultural, community assets)?

How does the candidate identify and support language demands (i.e., vocabulary, function, syntax, discourse) associated with the central focus?

How are the informal and formal assessments selected or designed to monitor students’ progress to demonstrate the central focus throughout the learning segment?

Task 2: Instructing and Engaging Students in the Learning

How does the candidate demonstrate a positive learning environment that supports student learning (i.e., rapport with and respect for and among students, challenging but low-risk where various perspectives are freely shared)?

How does the candidate actively engage students in developing the requisite abilities of the central focus?

How does the candidate elicit and build on student responses and discourse to promote thinking and develop the requisite abilities of the central focus?

How does the candidate use subject-specific pedagogy to help students develop the requisite abilities of the central focus?

How does the candidate use evidence to evaluate and change teaching practice to meet students’ individual and collective learning needs related to the central focus?

Task 3: Assessing Student Learning

How does the candidate analyze evidence of student learning related to the central focus (i.e., analysis of what students did right and wrong, analysis based on specific examples of strengths/needs that demonstrate patterns of learning for whole class)?

What type of feedback does the candidate provide to focus students?

How does the candidate support focus students to understand and use feedback to guide their further learning?

How does the candidate analyze students’ use of language to develop content understanding?

How does the candidate use the analysis of what students know and are able to do to plan next steps in instruction (i.e., provide targeted support to whole class, individuals, or groups to improve their learning related to the central focus)?