Science Pub

Meet some of OSU’s leading researchers. Delve into their fascinating worlds in casual Science Pubs at McMenamins in Bend, and in Sisters and Sunriver. No scientific background required—just bring your curiosity, sense of humor and appetite for food, drinks and knowledge!

FREE - RESERVATIONS REQUIRED AND LIMITED TO 100

  • Networking begins at 5:30 p.m., presentations begin at 6:30 p.m.
  • Full menu, no-host bar.
  • Science Pubs are popular and sometimes sell out. Reservations required no later than 5:00 p.m. the day prior to each lecture.
  • Click "register" below the Science Pub you wish to attend. Online reservations available starting six weeks prior to each event. If you need to cancel your reservation, please email us so we can accommodate others.
  • Accommodations for disabilities may be made by calling 541-322-3100.

Upcoming Science Pubs

September 20, 2016  • Father Luke's Room, McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend

Naked Barley – Unveiling the Most Ancient Grain

Patrick HayesPatrick Hayes, Professor, Barley Breeding & Products, OSU College of Agricultural Sciences

Barley, arguably the world’s oldest crop, is the base of beer and is also approved as heart-healthy by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration. In the upcoming Science Pub, Patrick Hayes, a professor in OSU’s College of Agricultural Sciences and head of OSU’s barley breeding program, will explore the origins of barley and trace its journey from grain to glass through malting. He will bring the talk closer to home with a look at Full Pint, a barley variety grown at Mecca Grade Estate Malt in Madras.

Doors at 5:30 p.m.; Presentation starts at 6:30 p.m.

We are at capacity for this event.


October 18, 2016 • Father Luke's Room, McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend

Wolves in Oregon: Facts, Research, Issues

John Williams, Associate Professor, Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences, OSU College of Agricultural Sciences

john-williams

In 1995 and 1996, 31 wolves were reintroduced into Yellowstone National Park and 35 in central Idaho. These populations have grown to more than 1,500 with more than 835 in Idaho. As wolf populations have grown, so has predation on livestock, complicating cow and ranch management. Join OSU's John Williams to learn about a study that launched in 2008 and over the next six years collected data on both cattle and wolves. You'll follow both animals patterns across eight ranches and hear the many lessons learned about wolves in Oregon. 

Doors at 5:30 p.m.; Presentation starts at 6:30 p.m.


November 15, 2016

Denying the Deniers: The Science of Ocean Acidification

george-waldbusserGeorge Waldbusser, Associate Professor, Ocean Ecology and Biogeochemistry, OSU College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences

The ocean is absorbing a significant proportion of human derived carbon dioxide, which is changing the chemistry of the world's oceans. The Oregon coast has become a rallying point for industry, government and academia to take action on this problem due to the impacts on the regional shellfish industry.  George Waldbusser, an OSU researcher focusing on marine ecology, will discuss the current state of knowledge on ocean acidification and its impacts on marine life, with a focus on the Oregon coast and its crucial oyster industry. This Science Pub will be interactive with demonstrations using live oysters, real-time carbon dioxide sensors and a live chemistry lesson.

 

Save the date for upcoming 2016 Science Pubs:

December 20
 

Science Pub Archive

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2009-2010